How ISS astronauts saw the eclipse

The solar eclipse of March 20, 2015, as captured from aboard the International Space Station by astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti. Check out her series of 21 photos of that eclipse.

The solar eclipse of March 20, 2015, as captured from aboard the International Space Station by astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti. Check out her series of 21 photos of that eclipse.

ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli took this picture during the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse of the sun, from the International Space Station. It’s the moon’s shadow, sweeping across Earth. Those in the shadow’s path saw the total solar eclipse. Many outside the shadow’s path saw a partial eclipse. From their unique vantage point 250 miles (400 km) above Earth’s surface, astronauts aboard ISS saw the moon’s shadow on Earth’s surface during the eclipse and crossed the path of the eclipse three times on its 90 minute-long orbits around the Earth. Image via ESA/ NASA.

Moon’s shadow seen from ISS, by ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli on August 21, 2017. Image via ESA/ NASA.

„The International Space Station passed 3 times on Monday through the moon’s penumbral shadow. Images of the moon’s shadow on Earth, seen from space, acquired by ISS astronauts.

Did the International Space Station (ISS) see a total solar eclipse on August 21, 2017? No. According to NASA’s EclipseScience, during this eclipse, ISS passed through the moon’s penumbral shadow – its lighter, outer shadow – three times. It never passed through the darker, inner portion of the moon’s shadow – called the umbra. Thus ISS astronauts didn’t see a total solar eclipse. Instead, they saw a partial eclipse from their vantage point in space. However, during ISS’s second pass through the moon’s penumbral show, the astronauts did see and capture images of the moon’s shadow on Earth, from the perspective of space. (…)“

Original article by Deborah Byrd

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