Bacteria on Space Station

nasa.com

nasa.com

Living bacteria have been found on the outside of the International Space Station, a Russian cosmonaut told the state news agency TASS. Anton Shkaplerov, who will lead Russia’s ISS crew in December, said that previous cosmonauts swabbed the station’s Russian segment during spacewalks and sent the samples back to Earth. The samples came from places on the station that had accumulated fuel waste, as well as other obscure nooks and crannies. Their tests showed that the swabs held types of bacteria that were not on the module when it originally launched into orbit, Shkaplerov says.

In his interview with TASS, Shkaplerov says the bacteria „have come from outer space and settled along the external surface“—a claim that sparked some media outlets to issue frenzied reports about aliens colonizing the space station. For now, though, details about the swabbing experiment are thin on the ground. Shkaplerov did not note whether the study has been vetted by a peer-reviewed journal, which means it’s unclear exactly when and how the full experiment was conducted, or how the team avoided any contamination from much more mundane bacteria on the cosmonauts or in the Earth-bound lab. Interview requests with the Russian space agency were unanswered when this article went to press. Rather than microbes raining down from outer space, it’s much more plausible that the outside of the space station became contaminated by earthly organisms, many of which can survive in the harsh environment in orbit.

Up in the vacuum of space, microbes have to deal with turbulent temperatures, cosmic radiation, and ultraviolet light. But Earth is home to plenty of hardy organisms that can survive in extreme environments, like virtually indestructible tardigrades. Sometimes, researchers intentionally send terrestrial contaminants, such as E. coli and rocks covered in bacteria, into space to see how it will react. And TASS reports that on a previous ISS mission, bacteria accidentally hitched a ride to the station on tablet PCs and other materials. Scientists sent these objects up to see how they would fare in space, and the freeriding organisms managed to infiltrate the outside of the station. They remained there for three years, braving temperatures fluctuating between -150 and 150 degrees Celsius. These types of discoveries present concerns for scientists trying to limit the spread of human germs on other worlds. (…)

Source: news.nationalgeographic.com

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